Renewable Energy

Renewable Energy

Generating energy at the farm is not new business. One of the most traditional fixtures of the farmstead is the windmill. Today’s wind turbines are farming the same wind patterns that have existed for centuries. New technologies and improved economics (more costly fossil fuels) are driving an explosion of new wind farms in rural areas. The associated revenues sustain not only the farm owner, but the whole farming community – including the environment — with a clean, renewable energy resource.

Development of renewable energy resources requires many years of planning. Lease agreements with the farm tenant must provide for such land uses and be fairly structured to compensate the farm tenant for lost crop revenues and restricted access. Coordination with organic certifying agencies and local soil and water (USDA) offices is required. The development time frame for a wind farm normally exceeds the three year minimum of an organic transition.

Our current projects are focused on wind applications, but solar farm uses are under economic review for potential inclusion down the road.

 

There are two spiritual dangers in not owning a farm. One is the danger of supposing that breakfast comes from the grocery, and the other that heat comes from the furnace.” — Aldo Leopold, A Sand County Almanac